11 Results $ Paperback. THE LONGEST WAR. $ Hardcover. Prisoner Without A Name, Cell Without a Number by Jacobo Timerman ( $ “At two in the morning of April 15, , twenty armed men in civilian clothes arrested Jacobo Timerman, editor and publisher of a leading Buenos Aires. Directed by Linda Yellen. With Roy Scheider, Liv Ullmann, Trini Alvarado, Roy Brocksmith.

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Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The bestselling, classic personal chronicle of the Argentine publisher’s ordeal at the hands of the Argentine government–imprisoned and tortured as a dissenter and as a Jew–that aroused the conscience of the world.

Jacobo Timerman was born jaclbo the Ukraine, moved with his family to Argentina inand was deported to Israel in He returned to Argentina i The bestselling, classic personal chronicle of the Argentine publisher’s ordeal at the hands of the Argentine government–imprisoned and tortured as a dissenter and as a Jew–that aroused the conscience of the world.

He returned to Argentina in An outspoken champion of human rights and freedom of the press, he criticized all repressive governments and organizations, regardless of their political ideologies. His other books include The Longest War: Israel in Lebanon, Cuba: A Journey, and Chile: A Death in the South.

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Be the first to ask a question about Prisoner without a Name, Cell without a Number. Lists with This Book. Feb 13, Scott rated it did not like it.

Good grief, I could not finish this short book fast enough. I thought it would be about the experience of a prisoner under Argentina’s dictatorship.

That becomes nearly a side story, allowing Timerman to expound upon anti-Semitism and Zionism. Had the book actually been about being a prisoner, I would timermxn found it much more rewarding.

Jacobo Timerman: Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number (TV Movie ) – IMDb

The passages that do deal with it are extremely well-written and both extremely disturbing and enlightening. The depiction of a dehumanizing system is very Good grief, I could not finish this short book fast enough. The depiction of a dehumanizing system is very important reading. However, I had a hard time with his theorizing. The way he easily threw around terms like fascist, communist, terrorist, nazi, etc. The self-righteousness that he always had the right answer and understood the correct path put me off.

Finally, there was the major role Zionism played in the book. Timerman clearly believed anti-Semitism was universal and inevitable and that the solution was Zionism. I don’t discount how horrific anti-Semitism is, nor the anti-Semitic nature of the Argentinian regime, but Zionism is not the answer.

The moral superiority he places in a movement that destroyed and ethnically-cleansed the Palestinian people kacobo intolerable. The tragic irony is that while he was writing about his experiences with torture in his new Tel Aviv home, Palestinians were being tortured in similar ways by Israel – the very Zionist project he so ardently supported.

As the jwcobo of jacoobo of the few domestic newspapers to openly criticize the violence of both the left and the right in s Argentina, Jacobo Timerman was a marked man. Detained without charge by the military junta in and held in clandestine concentration camps until his sudden release and deportation to Timegman inTimerman was subjected to extensive physical tlmerman as well as the psychological trauma of isolation cells, humiliation at the hands of his captors, and ongoing uncerta As the publisher of one of the few domestic newspapers to openly criticize the violence of both the left and the right in s Argentina, Jacobo Timerman was a marked man.

Detained without charge by the military junta in and held in clandestine concentration camps until his sudden release and deportation to Israel inTimerman was subjected to extensive physical torture as well as the psychological trauma of isolation cells, humiliation at the hands of his captors, and ongoing uncertainty over his fate and that of his family and peers. Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number is a poignant and poetic memoir of Timerman’s rapid descent from being a well-known public figure to a nameless and hidden victim of the military junta’s oppression, but also an exploration of the societal passivity that permits totalitarianism to take hold.

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Jzcobo book gives a unique take on this complicated country. Though he began life as an immigrant, Timerman rose to a place among Argentina’s intelligentsia. As a journalist, he enjoyed access to the nation’s elites and to the corridors of power.

As a detainee, he acknowledges a certain level of special treatment few others had the celebrity of Timerman, which even led members of the junta and foreign governments to intervene on his behalf. But Timerman did not escape the sadistic nature of the regime, and he gives a measured account of the timerkan applied to him and his fellow political prisoners. Parallel to this narrative, Timerman also explores wider psychological and political themes. He writes eloquently of the sense of asphyxiation as all rational paths for resolving the political impasse confronting Argentina in the mid s were closed off by the extremes especially the right’s fervent ajcobo to restore order by any means.

Chapter Five is particularly effective at conveying the dwindling space for reason in those tumultuous days, and tiemrman a valuable perspective for anyone seeking to understand the onset of the dictatorship.

Timerman also explores the prisoner’s condition, ruminating on the themes of hope, memory, and prisoner-captor relations. His insights are chilling: The interrogator always jafobo to feel that he can succeed in modifying the will of the interrogated.

The regime emulated many aspects of the Nazi machine, from an ideological obsession with rooting out the “enemy within” to the institutionalization of concentration camps and extermination as state policy. While the junta considered many groups suspect and targeted many sectors of society ruthlessly, Jews were often singled out for special humiliation and persecution by the regime.

Timerman describes the repeated interrogations of his faith and his presumed ulterior motives as a Jew. In a passage at the heart of Chapter Nine, he relays the barrage of questions directed at him during his appearance at a military tribunal on an unspecified charge. His captors inform him that World War III has begun, that Argentina is timermaan vanguard in thwarting left-wing terrorism, that Jews have a hand in timermzn anti-Argentine campaign that threatens to undermine the war effort.

Timerman is bemused but not altogether surprised by this pastiche of conspiracy theories, ideological fervor, and deep-seated discrimination—what he terms “hatred transformed into fantasy”—masquerading as an organizing principle for society. After all, we’ve seen this before. Writing after his release and expulsion from Argentina to Jjacobo, a country he barely knows, Timerman dedicates much of Chapter Eleven to asserting his view that the then ongoing Argentine dictatorship demonstrated that the world had learned nothing from the Holocaust.

Both were permeated by the same silence from the majority, the same political accommodations with totalitarian intolerance, the same terror rimerman upon scapegoat minorities.

Jacobo Timerman

As Timerman notes in a passage describing the period not long before the coup, What there was, from the start, was the great silence, which appears in every civilized country that passively accepts the inevitability of violence, and then the fear that suddenly befalls it.

That silence which can transform any nation into an accomplice. It is this broader discussion—of the public passivity which can pave the way to totalitarianism—that elevates this book from a tale of one man’s torture at the hands of a distant dictatorship, to a work with continuing resonance in our current era and those yet to come.

Timerman is far from a radical leftist when he is arrested by the dictatorship of General Jorge Rafael Videla. Timerman must have realised the accuracy of this prediction given the amount of time he spends in the rest of the book dissecting the anti-Semitic, anti-democratic beliefs of his torturers, just as they were deeply interested in his Jewishness and his liberal Zionist outlook.

Timerman found they had a fully worked out anti-Semitic ideology. The most elaborate definition in the book is as follows: Timerman spends much of the book discussing why Jews feature so prominently in such demonising world-views, and he reaches explicitly Zionist conclusions about why the Jewish people need their own state. Timerman felt let down by the Diaspora Jewish community of Argentina itself, and after he was freed he moved to Israel although his son Hector Timerman remains a prominent Argentine politician.

He also publicly compared Israeli government policies toward Palestinians to Apartheid in South Africa. Timerman never forgot that the Argentine military dictatorship, even at its most anti-Semitic, remained an ally of the US.

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The book is short, but packs in a lot of information. At his best Timerman matches the political analysis with strong sense of what it feels like to experience total confinement and isolation. He was tempted by suicide and often doubted his own sanity. But as another prisoner said to him: Jacobo Timerman tells the shocking story of his imprisonment and torture in Argentina in the late 70s interweaving it with reflections from his perspective as the owner and editor of an argentine newspaper that struggled to maintain some integrity as Argentina sank deeper and deeper into totalitarianism.

Timerman’s ordeal reveals how frighteningly close to the surface old hatreds lie. Thus antisemitism appears like the mythological hydra. Cutting off one head leads only to more growing if the cl Jacobo Timerman tells the shocking story of his imprisonment and torture in Argentina in the late 70s interweaving it with reflections from his perspective as the owner and editor of an argentine newspaper that struggled to maintain some integrity as Argentina sank deeper and deeper into totalitarianism.

Jacobo Timerman – Wikipedia

Cutting off one head leads only to more tmerman if the climate is right. Jacoho was very ignorant of this history though I had at least heard of Peron. Evita ensures his name lives on. Timerman repeatedly reminds the reader that jxcobo a blind eye in the face of abuse and injustice is tantamount to condoning the abuse. Apr 03, Meaghan rated it really liked it Shelves: This is unlike any other political prisoner’s memoir I’ve ever read — not that I’ve read many, perhaps five — in that Timerman was an actual political activist and not just an ordinary person who got swept up in the ever-rising tide of persecution.

The setting is Argentina but, as Timerman himself pointed out, his story could just as easily have taken place in Soviet Russia or Nazi Germany or any of scores of other countries. I enjoyed this and it really made me think, but it’s not for everyone This is jaccobo any other political prisoner’s memoir I’ve ever read — not that I’ve read many, perhaps five — jacobk that Timerman was an actual political activist and not just an ordinary person who got swept up in the ever-rising tide of persecution.

I enjoyed this and it really made me think, but it’s not for everyone. It’s not written in chronological timrrman Timerman skipped around quite a lot, at times describing the tortures he went through, at times talking about the anti-fascist newspaper he founded which lead to his imprisonment, at times reflecting on the state of Argentina and what leads an entire country to behave this way. Timerman was Jewish and believed he was imprisoned in large part because of that, so he spent many pages talking about anti-Semitism in Argentina.

I think this would be a good book for people wanting to learn recent Argentine history, as that is a topic examined at length. I really admired Timerman for taking a stand, knowing full well just what he was getting into, but doing it anyway because someone had to. But if you’re simply looking for a book on what it’s like to be a political prisoner, there are better ones out there for that.

Nov 30, Trebor rated it liked it. This is a harrowing trip thru ti,erman political and social meltdown that was Timermam in the 70s as Timerman recounts the torture he endured in a number of Argentina prisons. Timerman is a journalist and articulates well the completely irrational excesses of the dirty war that got him arrested but never charged. It’s also a pretty good description of the political realities, anti semitism and general chaotic tiemrman corruption that has plagued the nation since Peron.

Timerman’s historical perspecti This is a harrowing trip thru the political and social meltdown that was Argentina in the yimerman as Timerman recounts the torture he endured in a number of Argentina prisons.